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REVIEW BY JAMES ROSEN

 

Gray in Black and WhiteThe June, 2008 issue of The American Spectator contains a major review of IN NIXON'S WEB by James Rosen, Fox News Washington correspondent and author of  the best-selling THE STRONG MAN: John Mitchell and the Secrets of Watergate.

 

HIGHLIGHTS:

"In Nixon's Web is one of the most careful and exhaustive exercises in media criticism—in the painstaking correction of false, if not outright libelous, news reporting—to emerge from the saturation coverage Watergate era, and it trains especial focus on that era's most celebrated reporters, Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein of the Washington Post. Also pointedly corrected here, using a wealth of previously unpublished documents, transcripts, and tapes, is the official account of the great scandal as it was proffered in sworn testimony by senior Nixon administration officials and in the final reports of the major investigative bodies. Gray's meticulous attention to facts and details—above all, his devotion to the truth—makes In Nixon's Web an indispensable contribution to the literature of Watergate, a righting, and supplementing, of the extant record that no scholar or student of the era can afford to ignore."

. . .

"In their bestselling book All the President's Men, and in the hugely successful film based on it, Woodward used the code name "Deep Throat" to identify Felt. But through a careful examination of Woodward and Bernstein's archival papers, which the University of Texas paid $5 million to acquire—the Gray collection should fetch three times that—Ed Gray, in a brilliantly researched coda, demolishes forever the notion that Deep Throat was Mark Felt alone. Others have already made inroads on this subject, but the use of Woodward's own typed notes makes the judgment final. Indeed, Ed Gray even identified one of the other sources Woodward has been protecting with the Deep Throat umbrella for all these years—and got that individual to admit as much, on the record. Only Woodward, who cooperated with the Gray project until the questions became uncomfortable, is left clinging to the fictions of All the President's Men."

. . .

"Rarely does a man as vilified as Gray was—the only one of the 10 Nixon aides depicted on the cover of All the President’s Men who never pleaded guilty to, or was convicted of, a crime—live long enough, and keep such careful records, to rebut his slanderers with such thoroughness and name-naming specificity."

. . .

Read the whole review here.

 
 
Copyright 2008 LPGIII Pages LLC
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